(Source: cyberboy2003, via 90s90s90s)

(Source: beanpoutine)

(Source: longxview, via 90s90s90s)

Hittin dat smoek

Hittin dat smoek

(Source: cockbarf, via 90s90s90s)

degrassibible:

 

(Source: plasticpiranhas, via bloodthirstybabe)

r u hyper????

r u hyper????

lus-e:

Still closed…Still closed…Mmm…

WHY U SO SAD, SIEGMEYER 

lus-e:

Still closed…Still closed…Mmm…

WHY U SO SAD, SIEGMEYER 

(via vgjunk)

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

Players drew cards corresponding to colony names, then had to deploy cards representing assets like boats, engineers, colonists, schools, and equipment, in order to win cards representing the exports of the various colonies.  “Images on the game,”Getty Research Institute curator Isotta Poggi writes in her blog post on the document, “provide a vivid picture of the vast variety of resources, including animals, plants, and minerals, that the colonies provided to France.” Cartoons on the cards depict coal (mined by a figure clearly intended to be a “native”), rubber, wood, and even wild animals.

Along the way, players needed to avoid pitfalls like sickness, “laziness,” and intemperance (illustrated by a cartoon of a red-cheeked white man in khakis and a white hat, served by a “native” in “traditional” dress). Once the cards representing a colony’s major exports had been won, the colony was considered “exploitée,” and was out of the game.  

read more on this board game designed to teach french children to admire french colonialism and enlist them in the colonial project here. (via)

A terrible, but beautiful, board game about the merits of French colonialism

(via gameological)

FAVORITE PART OF MY FAVORITE MOVIE

FAVORITE PART OF MY FAVORITE MOVIE

(Source: thecarlosramos, via dvvglvs)